AWS CloudFront vs Global Accelerator

AWS CloudFront vs Global Accelerator

  • Global Accelerator and CloudFront both use the AWS global network and its edge locations around the world.
  • Both services integrate with AWS Shield for DDoS protection.
  • Performance
    • CloudFront improves performance for both cacheable content (such as images and videos) and dynamic content (such as API acceleration and dynamic site delivery).
    • Global Accelerator improves performance for a wide range of applications over TCP or UDP by proxying packets at the edge to applications running in one or more AWS Regions.
  • Use Cases
    • CloudFront is a good fit for HTTP use cases
    • Global Accelerator is a good fit for non-HTTP use cases, such as gaming (UDP), IoT (MQTT), or VoIP, as well as for HTTP use cases that require static IP addresses or deterministic, fast regional failover.
  • Caching
    • CloudFront supports Edge caching
    • Global Accelerator does not support Edge Caching.

AWS CloudFront vs Global Accelerator

AWS Certification Exam Practice Questions

  • Questions are collected from Internet and the answers are marked as per my knowledge and understanding (which might differ with yours).
  • AWS services are updated everyday and both the answers and questions might be outdated soon, so research accordingly.
  • AWS exam questions are not updated to keep up the pace with AWS updates, so even if the underlying feature has changed the question might not be updated
  • Open to further feedback, discussion and correction.
  1. A company wants to improve the availability and performance of its stateless UDP-based workload. The workload is deployed on Amazon EC2 instances in multiple AWS Regions. What should a solutions architect recommend to accomplish this?
    1. Place the EC2 instances behind Network Load Balancers (NLBs) in each Region. Create an accelerator using AWS Global Accelerator. Use the NLBs as endpoints for the accelerator.
    2. Place the EC2 instances behind Application Load Balancers (ALBs) in each Region. Create an accelerator using AWS Global Accelerator. Use the ALBs as endpoints for the accelerator.
    3. Place the EC2 instances behind Network Load Balancers (NLBs) in each Region. Create a CloudFront distribution with an origin that uses  Route 53 latency-based routing to route requests to the NLBs.
    4. Place the EC2 instances behind Application Load Balancers (ALBs) in each Region. Create a CloudFront distribution with an origin that uses Route 53 latency-based routing to route requests to the ALBs.

References

AWS_Global_Accelerator_FAQs

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